Do you want businesses and world leaders to act on the climate crisis? We make it easy for you to reach them.

Here is your guide to creating a climate review on We Don’t Have Time— plus a list of companies, organizations and leaders that have already joined the climate dialogue.

Here’s how to get started.

1. Download the We Dont Have Time app and create an account. (It’s free.)

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2. Log in, and click on the green pen to create a post.


What we homo sapiens decide to do over the next 10 years is more important to our existence and that of nature than what we have done in the previous 200,000 years. Will we embrace what research and science have been telling us for decades: that we are the cause of earth’s warming, and that there are sustainable ways to slow down and stop global warming?

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This is a guest blog post by John Moorhead, a Drawdown Europe Research Association (DERA) board member, Climate & Sustainability advisory board member, president for Drawdown Switzerland and Climate Reality Leader.

By 2040, humans need to be taking out more greenhouse gases from the atmosphere than putting in, and truly be living in harmony with nature. To achieve this massive transformation, at all levels of society from 2021, education and finance need to urgently change.

  • The world’s children need to be educated on what the sustainable solutions to global warming are and how to deploy them.
  • Out-of-school children need to be enrolled and sustainability programmes for the over 1 billion in-school children need to…


Reducing your carbon footprint can be both easy and fun. Just follow these simple guidelines and learn how you can become a climate hero in no time.

1. Go to wedonthavetime.org and download our app. For the desktop version, just sign in.

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2. Create an account.


You might have heard the name. But what is the IPCC really? And what does it do? Well, the most entertaining explanation you’ll ever get is right before your eyes.

In this guest post blog, the author tells the story behind the most unexpected graphic novel of the year.

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Two pages from the graphic novel “Because IPCC”.

GUEST BLOG

There are people who are certain that the world is coming to an end because of climate change, and there are people who are certain that climate change is a hoax, and there are people at every point along the grey zone in between. Those of us who believe what the science tells us, that climate change is real and that it is being caused by humans, we still aren’t always certain of the underlying authority behind our beliefs.

A news item may bring some scientific study to our attention, but how well equipped are we to say that this scientific study has more or less authority than the one we heard about last week? Do the findings of a science council outweigh those of a public interest group? …


Thanks to ClimateHero, the members of We Don't Have Time have reduced 3 000 tons of carbon per year. In 2021 the two partners aim for a twentyfold increase in reduction numbers — while influencing millions more along the way.

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His passion for surfing turned Robert Sabelström into a climate villain. But he found a way around it.

Robert Sabelström is as Swedish serial entrepreneur who has been involved in founding three start-ups, lead a recycling company in Poland, served as a management consultant, and written a book about growth hacking.

For years Robert has also been a keen surfer, and indirectly this is the reason why he founded ClimateHero. Surfing, although not a carbon-intensive sport on its own, turned Robert into a climate villain. The first time he calculated his own climate footprint, in 2017, he weighed in at almost 20 tons of carbon dioxide per year.

”A large part of my carbon footprint came from air travel. I used to do at least four surf trips a year, where at least one included a distant destination, such as Australia. These trips were an incredibly important part of my lifestyle and I would never have imagined stopping flying, until I tried”, he says. …


The EU is making economic pledges on an unprecedented scale. But are they really enough?
Unfortunately, the answer is no. Not if want our investments to be rational. In this guest blog, Senior Analyst Ulf Holmberg explains why.

When the European Commission in December 2019 announced its ambition to make the union climate neutral by 2050, they were rightfully applauded by almost everyone. Undoubtedly, the European Green Deal was a huge step in the right direction as the deal included the revision of relevant climate-related policy instruments and freed up monetary resources to help economies transition towards climate neutrality.

The European Green Deal Investment Plan (EGDIP) is expected to mobilize investments of at least €1 trillion in sustainable investments over the next decade. It was also decided that 30 percent of the massive €750 billion COVID-19 recovery fund would be set aside for greening the economic recovery. In total, this adds up to climate related investment pledges of about €1225 billion over the forthcoming ten years. …


In Lagos, Nigeria, We Don’t Have Time partner Afrigod has hosted its first-ever Sports for Climate event — a football tournament for a brighter future.

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Cleanup exercise before the beginning of the games.

The day-long football tournament on Saturday, November 28, featured four local teams — Goldenboyz FC, Divine Raiders FC, Nameless FC, and Workload NG — competing against one another. The event, organized in collaboration with We Don't Have Time and the Swedish Association for Responsible Consumption, began with a local litter cleanup, followed by discussions about the climate. At the end of the day of matches, it was Divine Raiders FC who took home the winners’ cup.


Read an excerpt from a brand-new book on how the current pandemic can pave way for the transition to a more sustainable economic system.

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”A chicken can’t lay a duck egg”, written by Grame Maxton and Bernice Maxton-Lee is a brand-new book on how covid-19 could actually be a very good thing for the climate.

Graeme Maxton, author of several acclaimed books on climate change, is an Advisory Board Member on the UN’s Energy Pathways Project, and was previously Secretary General of the Club of Rome.

Bernice Maxton-Lee is a former director of the Jane Goodall Institute. She lectures on climate change and deforestation at the Technical University in Vienna and is a Research Associate at ETH University in Zurich.

We Don’t Have Time has been given the privilige to publish two chapters from their new book, as well as the audio version of the introduction. …


Finnish design agency Vincit has created a methodology for designing products and services that don’t harm the planet. The company is now using its partnership with We Don’t Have Time to reach out to a broader audience, and has already found a potential client in Kenya.

The design and software company Vincit was founded in Tampere, Finland, in 2007. Today, the company has got more than 450 employees in Finland, USA and Switzerland, and last year it reached a turnover of 48 million euros.

Vincit has been awarded “Best workplace in Finland” three years in a row. In 2016 it was labeled “Best workplace in Europe”, and this year its US branch was ranked “Best workplace for innovators” in the USA.

Having made sure it takes good care of its employees, Vincit decided to also take care of the world. A new vision was created: For a world without fear of tomorrow. And this new vision eventually gave birth to Planet Centric Design, a methodology to help create sustainable business opportunities, based on a mindset of responsibility, transparency and systemic thinking. …


The Swedish pension company SPP has cut out fossil fuels from its investments. SPP is now aiming to become even more transparent in its climate work — and by using the Climate Dialogue service, the company has found an easy way to do so.

Pension funds are often neglected in discussions on climate impact. An odd fact, considering that in Sweden alone, companies are investing almost 60 million dollars a day in occupational pensions for their employees. But too much of that money is still going into the fossil fuel industry or other unsustainable business.

”It’s great to order organic coffee for the lunchroom, but we shouldn’t forget about the potential impact of sustainably invested pensions”, says Johanna Lundgren Gestlöf, head of sustainability at SPP.

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”We see a big financial risk in remaining in the fossil industry”, says Johanna Lundgren Gestlöf, head of sustainability at SPP. Photo: Dan Coleman

Last year SPP, a part of the Storebrand group, made all their funds fossil-free, and just recently the company launched ”Your climate footprint”, a tool for corporate clients to help measure the total carbon footprint of the occupational pension fund assets for all employees. Dow Jones Sustainability Index now ranks Storebrand/SPP as one of the world’s ten percent most sustainable listed companies in the world. …

About

We Don’t Have Time

We Don’t Have Time is a social network for climate action. Together we are the solution to the climate crisis.

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